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Labor Day – Recognizing the Many Hands Involved in Powering Michigan

This weekend we celebrate Labor Day; for most of us Labor Day marks the end of summer and the return of fall (even if the official first day of fall this year is September 23).

Labor Day is also a day that we recognize the dedicated men and women who work hard to make America the best that it can be. Here at AMP, that means remembering the more than 84,000 Michiganders who spend their days (and nights) at power plants, atop utility poles, and at computers and phones, ensuring that all of us can count on power when we flip the light switch or plug in our devices for charging, and that we have someone to help when the power goes out during a storm—sometimes at the risk of their own lives.

Linemen: Putting their Lives on the Line

As we highlighted in our blog on National Lineman Day in April, the true backbone of our power grid is the linemen (and women) who put their lives at risk every day to repair and upgrade lines, clear fallen trees, and restore power to customers. These linemen are on call 365 days a year in all kinds of weather – ice, rain, wind, and blistering heat– putting themselves in harm’s way to ensure reliable power for all of us. Linemen undergo hundreds of hours, even years, of practice and study in the technical and safety aspects of this dangerous job. These dedicated men and women deserve to be recognized as heroes for their brave service.

Dedication Throughout the System

Look around at any ball game, concert, or other community gathering this weekend, and you’ll probably meet up with a Michigan power worker. The men and women who generate and deliver the electricity you enjoy every day work in a myriad of jobs to bring you the convenience and reliability you’ve come to expect. In addition to linemen, Michigan’s energy industry depends on power plant operators, engineers, administrators, construction workers, emergency response teams, and call center operators to help power Michigan seamlessly.

Not only do they work to bring us energy, they also put their own energy back into their communities through programs to feed the hungry, protect wildlife, and serve others in a variety of ways. Our communities benefit from the men and women who work for our local energy providers, and we are grateful for their professional and personal dedication.